Cindy Adams: Andrew Cuomo’s enemies will not stop

Cindy Adams: Andrew Cuomo’s enemies will not stop

I have not spoken with Andrew Cuomo since 2016. Philadelphia. Wells Fargo Center. The Democratic National Convention.

That week’s embedded in my brain because jewelry I’d placed in the hotel’s locked downstairs vault I never ever saw again. So traumatic that I remember every second of my experience there. At the CNN Grill’s lunch break for VIPs is when he and I last spoke.

The point’s made because no way can my opinion now be explained with: “Oh, she’s a buddy of the governor …” No. I was only extremely close to his governor father Mario and his wife, Matilda.

So I just want to say you don’t like Andrew? OK, don’t like him. There isn’t anybody who doesn’t dislike somebody. Nobody likes everybody. He’s a bully, in office too long, upset over the nursing home tragedy? OK. But it has nothing to do with this opinion: Back when females wore stockings and bras, and gents opened doors for ladies, before investigations, sexual harassment headlines, shrill voices and HRs to run to, bosses made passes. Lousy — but happened to us all. Sometimes it worked well, sometimes not. Its handling was conversation around the office water fountain, back when we had an office and a water fountain.

The types who tower had power. It was the older generation’s roadbook. And many a Hollywood and Washington name traveled it.

Recently, a senior gentleman and young lady shared an elevator. At their mutual floor, he stepped back for her to precede him out. She then berated him loudly for his “stupidity” and misuse of today’s equality. He was stunned. He hadn’t yet graduated to today.

The world’s changed. In several cases for the better. And we, he, Andrew need change with it (although he says he’s done nothing wrong). But forgetting the front-page issue — a fact is he has enemies. They … just … want … him … out. Apart from the nursing home horror, grudges exist. Hate is flourishing. Bodies will fight against his survival.

Watch. This continues. The spadework has only begun. Their life’s work is to dig deep. Bodies known to many are already out there churning for more. 

Some vices nicer than others

On their own vices, there’s Naomi Campbell’s “I don’t care if they call me a bitch. A bitch is someone defending their rights” … Asked if he had any vices, Keanu Reeves, cigarette in hand, replied: “I don’t have one. Or I just don’t relate to them as vices” … There’s delicious Queen Latifah to InStyle magazine on her virtues: “There should be an award for best breasts in a movie. Of course, when they create that award, I’d better win it” … And Dolly Parton’s wisdom on why she always wears makeup: “[What if] we get an earthquake? … You never know if you’re going to wreck the [tour] bus, you never know if you’re going to be somewhere in a hotel and there’s going to be a fire.”

Pay attention

Donald once paid $2.75 mil for more than 400 upstate acres. He gave that land to the state of New York, and Gov. Pataki made that acreage into a park. Now’s a petition to rename it the “Ruth Bader Ginsburg Park” … Spike Lee’s doing an HBO series about New York, starting with 9/11 all the way through COVID. It’s how this city tackles adversity — rebuilds — and bounces back.

Stuck with virus

Internist/immunologist/lupus and autoimmune disease specialist Dr. Robert Lahita: “About 30 corona vaccines are now in development. Until all evidence is examined, it is so far believed there could be, months later, recurrence.”

Forensic pathologist Dr. Michael Baden, NYC’s former chief medical examiner: “We need to wait a few years to learn the time frame of return. Not yet clear how long the immunity will be. At this moment, we believe this is with us for a long time.” 


Enough about moving out of Manhattan. That’s winter. They’re back in summer. By the time you finish paying for your new home in the suburbs, those suburbs have moved 20 miles further out.

Only talking about New York, kids, only talking about New York.