These Are The Bizarre Rules Kate Middleton Must Follow When Giving Birth

These Are The Bizarre Rules Kate Middleton Must Follow When Giving Birth

With Will and Kate expecting their third child at any moment, the internet has been a-buzz with royal baby excitement. Kensington Palace has been rather tight-lipped about the exact due date, but sources say baby number three is due this month.



While many are excited to see if the new addition will be a boy or a girl, others are wondering if the little one will make their arrival on St. George's Day, which is April 23rd, or on Princess Charlotte's birthday, which is May 3.


Perhaps being born into a family with such strict traditions would seem normal if it's all you've ever known, but what about those who marry into the family? Meghan Markle has had to adjust her lifestyle quite a bit in order to marry Prince Harry this May.


Check out the video below to see which ten rules she now has to follow:

While no one will know for sure until Kate actually does go into labor, we can reveal plenty of information about what the birth of a royal baby is like, and it involves a lot of totally bizarre rules. Here are the top 10 Kate will have to follow:


1. She May Have A Home Birth



Until Princess Diana, it had been the tradition for royal births to take place in a royal residence. However, Diana broke with this tradition when she decided to have William and Harry in St. Mary’s Hospital in London.


Kate decided to do the same with George and Charlotte, but sources say she is considering reverting back to tradition for baby number three. Allegedly, Kate is considering a home birth in order to have a more peaceful birthing experience.


A source told the Express, "They were very concerned about the chaos caused with the first two children as hundreds of press and public camped outside for several days, and they would like to avoid a repeat if they could."


2. There Will Be Plenty Of Help



When a royal baby is born, there is an obscene number of medical professionals standing by at the ready. Midwives, for example, are sworn to secrecy and are on call for three months before the due date. However, more then just midwives are required to deliver a royal baby.


When Charlotte and George were born, there were two obstetricians, three midwives, three anesthetists, four theatre staff, two special care baby unit staff, four pediatricians, one lab technician and three to four hospital managers present.


3. The Queen Is The First To Know



It's the protocol that the reigning monarch always be the first to know when there has been a birth of a new royal family member. When baby George was born, it was reported that Prince William telephoned his grandmother on an encrypted line to inform her of the birth.


After the Queen has been notified, Will and Kate's private secretary will phone the Prime Minister along with a list of other selected VIPs, which includes the Archbishop of Canterbury.


The public will be told of the birth by this medieval tradition...